My second Toastmasters speech: Heroes


Below is my second Toastmasters speech, built on the requirement that I had to organize my speech properly; with a clear beginning, middle, and end. This is still in the form of the notes I spoke to during the speech. I’m planning to re-write it to fill in the blanks, similar to how I delivered it during the meeting. I got feedback after my speech that the portion where I talked about everyday heroes could use some expansion, and my transitions between ideas could use some smoothing out, so I’ll probably buff up the full-text version a bit.


Intro

Green skin! Stretchy arms! Invulnerability to bullets! They can fly! Woohoo!

  • In movies and comic books, this is how heroes are presented. But this isn’t a new thing.
  • Hero stories are some of the oldest stories we have.
  • The story of Gilgamesh, the King of Sumer, was first written down about 4,000 years ago.
  • Achilles was a hero of the Greek story of the battle of Troy
  • Bellerophon was the hero who captured the winged horse, Pegasus
  • In fact, if you look at their abilities, the heroes of ancient myth look a lot like our modern comic-book superheroes, or maybe the other way around, who knows…

Body

  • When I was a child, I was fascinated by heroes.
  • I watched The Amazing Spiderman every Saturday morning; I knew about Sampson, and David & Goliath
  • I wasn’t much of a comics reader, but boy did I love Aragorn and Faramir in The Lord of the Rings
  • When I was a little older, I devoured the stories in the Reader’s Digest magazines my mom got. There was a column called “Drama in Real Life,” filled with heart-wrenching stories of people saving their families, co-workers, and complete strangers.
  • I still love stories like that! We have featured some of them on Wells Fargo Stories, such as the one about the mortgage consultant who rescued two people from their car, stuck on a train track.
  • When I was growing up, I wanted to be one of those heroes. I had daydreams of saving people, but growing up in the suburbs doesn’t give you many opportunities like that.
  • As I got older, I started to collect heroes of my own, such as the surgeon who diagnosed my cancer and saved my life.
  • There are some pretty clear trends here.
    • In the ancient stories, the heroes are mostly demigods or the children of demigods,
    • In the comic books, most heroes have had some extreme thing happen that changed them from being “merely human” to being a superman.
    • Even my surgeon has a bit of the superhuman about him… years of training, decades of experience
  • Over time, I started to recognize another kind of hero
    • People with no superhuman skills; people who aren’t descended from gods, who haven’t been bitten by radioactive spiders, and who haven’t even had years of training to be surgeons, firemen, or rescue helicopter pilots.
    • People like my night nurse when I was recovering from my surgery. Whenever I woke up, there she was, with the most amazing patience and kindness.
  • I started realizing that I had known many heroic people,
    • Like my mom, who raised five kids at home with another in college; she woke up at 4 every morning to get the day started for her family; she worked part-time jobs to make ends meet.
    • Like my dad, who worked 50-60 hours a week, and when he came home grew food for us in a large garden next to the house.
  • These heroic people are not superhuman, they’re not flawless, and they don’t have extraordinary gifts.
  • What they do have is grit. They get up, show up, do what’s in front of them, and care deeply about the people in their lives.
  • They’re not only the unsung heroes, they’re often totally invisible to most everyone around them

Conclusion

  • I still love heroes, and will always love hearing the stories of the heroes of newspaper stories, who rush into burning buildings to save children or jump into rivers to save drowning people.
  • I certainly don’t mean to take anything away from people who do these things, but I want to suggest to you that, while not everyone is a hero, there are more heroes around us than we may be used to thinking of.
  • There are probably heroes right here in this room.
  • The person in the next chair might be a hero.
  • The person in your chair might be a hero.

Mr. Toastmaster…

Author: Jorah Lavin

I grew up in New England, moved to the Carolinas in '98 to start working at what was then a large regional bank and is now a really big nationwide bank. I work doing intranet content management and intranet site management for said bank. After work, I watch movies & eat. I've been studying Aikido since 2014, and I ride an old Honda Shadow. Someday I want to go skydiving.